Poems, Volume 3

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The University Press, 1907
 

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Page 500 - Oh sacred sorrow ! by whom souls are tried, Sent not to punish mortals, but to guide ; If thou art mine, (and who shall proudly dare To tell his Maker, he has had his share ?) Still let me feel for what thy pangs are sent, And be my guide and not my punishment...
Page 418 - Yes, I behold again the place, The seat of joy, the source of pain ; It brings in view the form and face That I must never see again. 'The night-bird's song that sweetly floats On this soft gloom — this balmy air, Brings to the mind her sweeter notes That I again must never hear. 'Lo! yonder shines that window's light, My guide, my token, heretofore; And now again it shines as bright, When those dear eyes can shine no more. 'Then hurry from this place away! It gives not now the bliss it gave ;...
Page 49 - Early he rose, and look'd with many a sigh On the red light that fill'd the eastern sky; Oft had he stood before, alert and gay, To hail the glories of the new-born day: But now dejected, languid, listless, low, He saw the wind upon the water blow, And the cold stream curl'd onward as the gale From the pine-hill blew harshly down the dale; On the right side the youth a wood survey'd, With all its dark intensity of shade; Where the rough wind alone was heard to move...
Page 49 - ... tie, grow negligent and cold — Far to the left he saw the huts of men, Half hid in mist, that hung upon the fen ; Before him swallows, gathering for the sea, Took their short flights, and twitter'd on the lea ; And near the bean-sheaf stood, the harvest done, And slowly blacken'd in the sickly sun ; All these were sad in nature, or they took Sadness from him, the likeness of his look, And of his mind — he ponder'd for a while, Then met his Fanny with a borrow'd smile.
Page 296 - O then, my lassie, lead the way To Comfort's Home, the ancient inn : That something holds, if we can pay — Old David is our living kin ; A servant once, he still preserves His name, and in his office serves !" " Alas ! that mine should be the fate Old David's sorrows to relate : But they were brief ; not long before He died, his office was no more. The kennel stands upon the ground, With something of the former sound...
Page 225 - Sorrows like showers descend, and as the heart For them prepares, they good or ill impart ; Some on the mind, as on the ocean rain, Fall and disturb, but soon are lost again — Some, as to fertile lands, a boon bestow, And seed, that else had perish'd, live and grow ; Some fall on barren soil, and thence proceed The idle blossom, and the useless weed ; But how her griefs the Widow's heart impress'd, Must from the tenor of her life be guess'd.
Page 402 - SATIRE. I LOVE not the satiric Muse : No man on earth would I abuse ; Nor with empoison'd verses grieve The most offending son of Eve. Leave him to law, if he have done What injures any other son : It hardens man to see his name Exposed to public mirth or shame ; And rouses, as it spoils his rest, The baser passions of his breast. Attack a book — attack a song — You will not do essential wrong ; You may their blemishes expose, And yet not be the writer's foes. But when the man you thus attack,...
Page 25 - There she reclined unmoved, her bosom bare "To her companion's unimpassion'd stare, 770 " And my wild wonder — Seat of virtue ! chaste, " As lovely once ! O ! how wert thou disgraced ! " Upon that breast, by sordid rags defiled, " Lay the wan features of a famish'd child ; — "That sin-born babe in utter misery laid, " Too feebly wretched even to cry for aid ; " The ragged sheeting, o'er her person drawn, " Served for the dress that hunger placed in pawn.
Page 295 - The trees are fled, They've cut the brook a straighter bed : No shades the present lords allow, The miller only murmurs now ; The waters now his mill forsake, And form a pond they call a lake.
Page 49 - When now the young are reared, and when the old, Lost to the tie, grow negligent and cold. Far to the left he saw the huts of men. Half hid in mist, that hung upon the fen; Before him swallows, gathering for the sea, Took their short flights, and...

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