The Father and Daughter, a Tale, in Prose: With an Epistle from the Maid of Corinth to Her Lover; and Other Poetical Pieces

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Davis, Wilks, and Taylor; and sold by Longman and Rees, 1801 - 244 pages
 

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Page 238 - tis to be an orphan boy ! Oh ! were I by your bounty fed ! Nay, gentle lady, do not chide — Trust me, I mean to earn my bread; The sailor's orphan boy has pride. Lady, you weep! ha! this to me? You'll give me clothing, food, employ? Look down, dear parents ! look, and see Your happy, happy orphan boy...
Page 233 - And sigh as I knock at the wealthy man's door. Then, alas ! when at night I return to my home, No longer I boast that my comforts are many ; To a silent, deserted, dark dwelling I come, Where no one exclaims 'Thou art welcome, my Fanny.
Page 58 - Mine is quiet now," replied Agnes : then recollecting that she had some food in her pocket, she offered some to the stranger, in order to divert his attention from the child. He snatched it from her hand instantly, and devoured it with terrible voraciousness ; but again he exclaimed, " I do not like children ; if you trust them, they will betray you...
Page 161 - ... may be allowed this vulgar but forcible expression, to inveigh bitterly against society for excluding from its circle, with unrelenting rigour, the woman who has once transgressed the salutary laws of chastity; and some brilliant and persuasive, but, in my opinion, mistaken writers, of both sexes, have endeavoured to prove that many an amiable woman has been for ever lost to virtue and the world, and become the victim of prostitution, merely because her first fault was treated with ill-judging...
Page 63 - ... in all the violence of frenzy. He raved, he tore his hair; he screamed and uttered the most dreadful execrations ; and with his teeth shut and his hands clenched, he repeated the word father, and said the name was mockery to him.
Page 50 - Agnes expected to arrive within twelve miles of her native place long before it was dark, and reach the place of her destination before bed-time, unknown and unseen: but she was mistaken in her expectations, for the roads had been rendered so rugged by the frost, that it was late in the evening when the coach reached the spot whence...
Page 237 - Poor foolish child ! how pleased was I, When news of Nelson's victory came, Along the crowded streets to fly, And see the lighted windows flame ! To force me home my mother sought ; She could not bear to see my joy, For with my father's life 'twas bought, And made me a poor Orphan Boy. The people's shouts were long and loud ; My mother, shuddering, closed her ears : " Rejoice ! rejoice !" still cried the crowd ; My mother answered with her tears.
Page 1 - The night was dark — the wind blew keenly over the frozen and rugged heath , when Agnes, pressing her moaning child to her bosom, was travelling on foot to her father's habitation. ' Would to God I had never left it...
Page 66 - So come along, master, come along," he continued, seizing Fitzhenry, who could with difficulty be separated from Agnes, — while another of the keepers, laughing as he beheld her wild anguish, said, " We shall have the daughter as well as the father soon, I see, for I do not believe there is a pin to choose between them.
Page 67 - But, severe as the sufferings of Agnes were already, a still greater pang awaited her. The keepers finding it a very difficult task to confine Fitzhenry, threw him down, and tried by blows to terrify him into acquiescence. At this outrage, Agnes became frantic indeed, and followed them with shrieks, entreaties, and reproaches ; while the struggling victim called on her to protect him, as they bore him by violence along, till, exhausted with anguish and fatigue, she fell insensible on the ground,...

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