Musae Seatonianae: A Complete Collection of the Cambridge Prize Poems, from the First Institution of that Premium by Tho. Seaton, in 1750, to the Present Time ...

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Pearch, 1772 - 334 pages
 

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Page 133 - At thy good time Let Death approach ; I reck not — let him but come In genuine form, not with thy vengeance arm'd, Too much for man to bear. O rather lend Thy kindly aid to mitigate his stroke...
Page 127 - Yet still they breathe destruction, still go on Inhumanly ingenious to find out New pains for life, new terrors for the grave. Artificers of Death ! Still monarchs dream Of universal empire growing up From universal ruin. Blast the design, Great God of Hosts, nor let thy creatures fall Unpitied victims at Ambition's shrine...
Page 126 - God ablmril : with violence rude to break The thread of life ere half its length was run, And rob a wretched brother of his being. With joy Ambition saw, and soon improvM The execrable deed.
Page 26 - Her own prophetic soul is active in her, And more than human providence her guard. . When Philomela, ere the cold domain Of crippled Winter 'gins t' advance, prepares Her annual flight, and in some poplar shade Takes her melodious leave, who then 's her pilot?
Page 63 - Their voices tun'd to transport, wing'd their flight, And bade them call for nurture, and receive : And lo ! they call, the blackbird and the thrush, The woodlark and the redbreast jointly call ; HE hears, and feeds their...
Page 129 - ... life the stripling darts, Gay as the morn ; bright glows the vernal sky.
Page vii - Judgment, Heaven, Hell, Purity of heart, &c. or whatever else may be judged by the Vice-Chancellor, Master of Clare Hall, and Greek Professor to be most conducive to the honour of the Supreme Being and recommendation of Virtue.
Page 36 - O, be still, ye boisterous winds,' he cry'd, And not a breath was blown, nor murmur heard. His was a life of miracles and might, And charity and love, ere yet he taste The bitter draught of death, ere yet he rise Victorious o'er the universal foe, And Death, and Sin and Hell in triumph lead. His by the right of...
Page vi - Which three persons aforesaid shall give out a subject, which subject shall, for the first year be one or other of the perfections or attributes of the Supreme Being, and...
Page 134 - To bleed for man, to teach him how to live, And oh ! still harder lesson ! how to die ; Disdain not Thou to smooth the restless bed Of Sickness and of Pain. Forgive the tear That feeble Nature drops, calm all her fears, Wake all her hopes, and animate her faith, Till my rapt soul, anticipating Heav'n, Bursts from the thraldom of incumb'ring clay, And on the wing of ecstasy upborne, Springs into Liberty, and Light, and Life.

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