The Scots Magazine, Volume 30

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Sands, Brymer, Murray and Cochran, 1768
 

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Page 257 - Till, quite dejected with my scorn, He left me to my pride, And sought a solitude forlorn, In secret, where he died. " But mine the sorrow, mine the fault, And well my life shall pay ; I'll seek the solitude he sought, And stretch me where he lay.
Page 256 - TURN, gentle Hermit of the dale, And guide my lonely way To where yon taper cheers the vale With hospitable ray. " For here forlorn and lost I tread, With fainting steps and slow; Where wilds, immeasurably spread, Seem lengthening as I go." " Forbear, my son," the Hermit cries, " To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom.
Page 257 - Turn, Angelina, ever dear, My charmer, turn to see Thy own, thy long-lost Edwin here, ^ ^ Restored to love and thee. « Thus let me hold thee to my heart, And every care resign ; And shall we never, never part, My life — my all that's mine? « No, never from this hour to part, We'll live and love so true; The sigh that rends thy constant heart, Shall break thy Edwin's too.
Page 238 - M. st. 2, c. 2, as one of the liberties of the people, " that the freedom of speech, and debates, and proceedings in parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 256 - No flocks that range the valley free, To slaughter I condemn: Taught by that Power that pities me, I learn to pity them : "But from the mountain's grassy side A guiltless feast I bring; A scrip with herbs and fruits supplied, And water from the spring. "Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego ; All earth-born cares are wrong; Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.
Page 238 - Fortescue, in the name of his brethren, declared, " that they ought not to make answer [ 164 ] " to that question : for it hath not been used aforetime that " the justices should in any wise determine the privileges " of the high court of parliament. For it is so high and " mighty in its nature, that it may make law : and that " which is law, it may make no law : and the determination " and knowledge of that privilege belongs to the lords of " parliament, and not to the justices.
Page 224 - I blufh again at the recollection that it has been at any time, and in any way, brought to the public eye, and drawn from the obfcurity in which it remained under my roof. Twelve copies of a fmall part of it had been printed in my houfe at my own private prefs.
Page 158 - How should I love the pretty creatures, While round my knees they fondly clung! To see them look their mother's features, To hear them lisp their mother's tongue! And when with envy time transported Shall think to rob us of our joys, You'll in your girls again be courted, And I'll go wooing in my boys.
Page 237 - Parliament doth no authority upon earth can undo, so that it is a matter most essential to the liberties of this kingdom, that such members be delegated to this important trust as are most eminent for their probity, their fortitude, and their knowledge, for it was a known apophthegm of the great lord treasurer Burleigh, " That England could never be ruined but by a parliament...
Page 193 - Because no sentiment represents what is really in the object. It only marks a certain conformity or relation between the object and the organs or faculties of the mind; and if that conformity did not really exist, the sentiment could never possibly have being. Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty.

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