The Ayrshire wreath, a collection of prose and verse relating to Ayrshire [ed. by R. Crawford].

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1855
 

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Page 51 - Perplex her mind ; but, wise as women are "When genial circumstance hath favoured them, She welcomed what was given, and craved no more ; Whate'er the scene presented to her view That was the best, to that she was attuned By her benign simplicity of life...
Page 49 - mid the wild weeds of a rugged soil, Thy bounty caused to flourish deathless flowers, From paradise transplanted : wintry age Impends; the frost will gather round my heart; If the flowers wither, I am worse than dead!
Page 51 - Her very presence such a sweetness breathed, That flowers, and trees, and even the silent hills, And everything she looked on, should have had An intimation how she bore herself Towards them and to all creatures.
Page 201 - Ever charming, ever new, When will the landscape tire the view; The fountain's fall, the river's flow, The woody valleys, warm and low ; The windy summit, wild and high, Roughly rushing on the sky! The pleasant seat, the ruined tower, The naked rock, the shady bower ; The town and village, dome and farm, Each give each a double charm, As pearls upon an ^Ethiop's arm.
Page 102 - O how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven, O how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven...
Page 52 - Instruct them how the mind of man becomes A thousand times more beautiful than the earth On which he dwells...
Page 143 - Once so loved by thee, Think of her who wove them, Her who made thee love them, Oh ! then remember me. When, around thee dying, Autumn leaves are lying, Oh ! then remember me. And, at night, when gazing, On the gay hearth blazing, Oh ! still remember me. Then...
Page 46 - Gentle as a weary wave Sinks, when the summer breeze hath died, Against an anchored vessel's side; Even so, without distress, doth she Lie down in peace, and lovingly.
Page 107 - On Norway's coast the widowed dame May wash the rocks with tears — May lang look o'er the shipless seas Before her mate appears. Cease, Emma, cease to hope in vain; Thy lord lies in the clay : The valiant Scots nae reivers thole To carry life away...
Page 48 - In sober plenty; when the spirit stoops To drink with gratitude the crystal stream Of unreproved enjoyment; and is pleased To muse, and be saluted by the air Of meek repentance, wafting wall-flower scents From out the crumbling ruins of fallen pride And chambers of transgression, now forlorn.

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