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" ... seldom, and absolutely never but where they are very apt and very short. Omit every circumstance that is not material, and beware of digressions. To have frequent recourse to narrative betrays great want of imagination. "
Old-time Schools and School-books - Page 267
by Clifton Johnson - 1904 - 381 pages
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Elements of a Polite Education: Carefully Selected from the Letters of the ...

Philip Dormer Stanhope Earl of Chesterfield - 1801 - 474 pages
...Capricious, — • greffions. To have frequent recourfe to narrative, betrays great want of imagination. Never hold any body by the button, or the hand, in order to be heard out ; for, if people are not willing to hear you, you had much better hold your tongue than them. Moft...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ...

Noah Webster - 1802 - 252 pages
...companies, more wrong heads than rl^/'jl ones-. — more people will deferve than who will bear cenlure. 7. Never hold any body by the button or the hand, in order to be heard through °1! ; for if the people are not wiL ling to hear you, you had much bitter hold your tongue...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ...

Noah Webster - 1804 - 254 pages
...more -wrong heads than right onus — more people who viillcleserve, than who will tear censure. 7. Never hold any body by the button or the hand, in...you had much better hold your tongue than hold them. , . 8. Never whisper in company. Conversation is common slock, in which all persons present have aright...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ...

Noah Webster - 1809 - 202 pages
...5. Frequent good company— copy their manners— imitate their virtues and accomplishments. •^ 7. Never hold any body by the button or the hand, in...be heard through your story ; for if the people are itot williiig to hear you, you had much better hold your tmgue than hold them. 8. Never whisper in...
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Lord Chesterfield's Advice to His Son, on Men and Manners: Or, A New System ...

Philip Dormer Stanhope Earl of Chesterfield - 1815 - 360 pages
...d'immagmaxione. Never hold any body by the button, or the hand, i» order to be heard out; for, if people are not willing to hear you , you had much better hold your tongue than them . Long talkers and whisperers. Long talkers generally single out some unfortunate man company...
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Letters Written by the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, Volume 1

Philip Dormer Stanhope Earl of Chesterfield - 1827 - 420 pages
...and beware of digressions. To have frequent recourse to narrative betrays great want of imagination. Never hold any body by the button, or the hand, in order to be heard out ; for, if people are not willing to hear you, you had much better hold your tongue than them. Most...
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Practical Morality; Or, A Guide to Men and Manners: Consisting of Lord ...

Philip Dormer Stanhope Earl of Chesterfield - 1831 - 290 pages
...name and expression ready at hand, that you may not be obliged oviu-y B Seizing people by the button. Never hold any body by the button, or the hand, in order to he heard out. for if people are not willii!Mi;irut to interrupt your nurration, and inquire of other...
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A collection of interesting and instructive lessons, intended as a sequel to ...

James Campbell (teacher of English.) - 1832 - 274 pages
...of imagination. Never hold any person by the button, or the hand, in order to be heard out; for, if people are not willing to hear you, you had much better hold your tongue than t/iey. ones, and many more who deserve censure than like it. Should you therefore expatiate in the...
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Instructive and Entertaining Lessons for Youth: With Rules for Reading with ...

Noah Webster - 1835 - 270 pages
...concern. 5. Frequent good company,— copy their manners,— imitate their virtues and accomplishments. 7. Never hold any body by the button or the hand, in...for if the people are not willing to hear you, you may much better hold your tongue than hold them, S. Never whisper in company. Conversation is common...
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Lord chesterfield's advice to his son, on men and manners [selections from ...

Philip Dormer Stanhope (4th earl of Chesterfield.) - 1836 - 96 pages
...frequent recourse to narrative betrays great want of imagination. SEIZING PEOPLE BY THE BUTTON. — Never hold any body by the button, or the hand, in order to be heard out ; for, if people are not willing to hear you, you had much better hold your tongue than them. LONG...
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